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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 29, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11:003m and these are the main stories this morning: victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts — a man who was falsely accused says it's a good idea. if my phone gets taken as a defendant, sue shoots the accuser, just so it is fair. spain's governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election, but will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. new proposals to fund social care in england could see the over—50s forced to pay more than £300 a year extra in national insurance.
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poor quality soil is releasing carbon into the atmosphere and adding to global warming, according to a major report. a box office smash — avengers endgame makes history by taking a record—breaking $1.2 billion in global ticket sales in its opening run. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. victims of crime, including those alleging rape, are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts or risk seeing their case dropped. the move, which applies to england and wales, is part of measures revealed by the director of public prosecutions to address failures in the disclosure of evidence to defendants. but campaigners say it could discourage victims
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from going ahead with prosecutions. our legal correspondent clive coleman reports. the case of liam allan, falsely accused of rape and sexual assault starkly exposed the problems of police and prosecutors failing to disclose relevant evidence to the defence. disclosure is the foundation of ourfair trial system. the prosecution must disclose evidence gathered by police which either helps the defence case or weakens its own. if that fails, miscarriages of justice can occur. following several collapsed trials, a series of reviews revealed a system—wide problem. at its core was the ability of police and prosecutors to get on top of unprecedented amounts of digital evidence on smart phones and social media. under a national disclosure improvement plan, all cps prosecutors and 93,000 police staff have received specialist training.
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disclosure champions have been appointed and management systems used for years in complex terrorism cases are now being used in all rape cases. but most controversial are new forms under which victims and witnesses are asked if they'll consent to have their smart phones examined. if they don't, it might halt a prosecution. it is neitherfor an investigating police officer, nor a prosecuting lawyer, to simply speculatively have a look at the content of a mobile phone or a laptop computer. that is not what we're asking, that is not what the consent forms and there for. no—one's pretending disclosure's easy, but if police and prosecutors can't reassure the public that they can obtain relevant digital evidence and pass that which is helpful to the defence, the future of our fair trial system is in jeopardy. clive coleman, bbc news.
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the issue of disclosure came to the fore when several court cases were halted because of evidence not being shared with defence solicitors. one of the defendants affected was student liam allan who was 22 at the time. he had charges dropped when critical material emerged while he was on trial. he told us his thoughts on the new proposals. i think it's a good start. i understand that there are some reservations about it and there's are a few concerns from people working for victims' charities. but considering how valuable it was in my case that the evidence was on the complainant's phone, it's much more invaluable than people realise and it could be so much more valuable to prosecution cases as well as defence cases. so for me, it's a good step in the right direction. but i can understand why people are a little bit concerned with it. i don't think it's fair to go through seven years' worth of information if it was only an accusation across a year period. that doesn't make sense because then that is an invasion of privacy, but there are certain things that are related to cases that are going to be
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in there, on either phone. so both phones should be taken. it's notjust one or the other, it should be both. a former government minister has proposed funding social care in england in a similar manner to the state pension. the conservative mp damian green believes wholesale changes are needed to ensure the system remains fair and adequately funded. the move could force over over—50s in england to pay an average of more than £300 a year extra in national insurance contributions. here's our social affairs correspondent alison holt. with more of us living longer, the demand from people needing help with day—to—day tasks like eating, getting dressed and washed, is increasing. councils that provide that support have also had their budgets cut. it means the care system's under huge pressure. today's report says the need for reform is urgent, to provide a safety net which will end the lottery of who gets state—funded care and who doesn't. the report calls for a nationally—funded pension—style scheme.
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it proposes a universal care entitlement to provide anyone who needs it with a decent standard of help. people would pay a care supplement on top if they wanted a more expensive level of support. the report also says the underfunding of the current care system must be tackled. we need universal care provision that is better than it is now so it will involve spending more taxpayers' money. we will need to find about £2.5 billion extra per year. on top of that, we need to allow people to, if they can, and many people can, particularly if they own property, they will be able to increase, buy an insurance policy or something like an annuity that will, when it's all pooled together, put a lot more money into the system. the government says it has put extra money into social care and plans for the future will be published at the earliest opportunity. alison holt, bbc news.
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let's return now to our main story today, victims of crime, including those alleging rate, are being asked to give police access to their mobile phones and social media accounts, under proposals from the director of public prosecutions to look at the issue of failure of disclosure of evidence. look at the issue of failure of disclosure of evidence. jocelyn anderson, is the chief executive at west mercia rape and sexual abuse centre. shejoins me now from worcester. what are your thoughts on these plans? i think it is a very interesting move when you are looking at rate investigations and child sexual abuse investigations and how they are conducted. there is and how they are conducted. there is a need to gather information. this is new, this is firming up a process
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that happens already. what the issues are is that it is not proportionate, not fair orfocused on the victim. why did you say it is not proportionate, fair or focused on the victim? if you imagine somebody‘s mobile phone. i have a work mobile, a personal mobile. this isn't just accessing work mobile, a personal mobile. this isn'tjust accessing information about the rate or the child sexual abuse, it is given access to your e—mails, your contacts, your text messages, your social media accounts, your internet browsing history. when you combine that with the demand made on rate victims quite often to handle the medical records, work records, it is a massive intrusion into somebody‘s life. there is also a misconception that sometimes people think you just hand your phone over, the information will be downloaded and you get it back. it can be gone for
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weeks, months, years. the quickest i have ever known a phone be handed backis have ever known a phone be handed back is eight weeks. it is not a short process. it really does impact on people's lives. it is the victim's phone that is taken of the perpetrator‘s. victim's phone that is taken of the perpetrator's. in the liam allen case, his film was taken as well. it is simply not the case that it is not just the alleged is simply not the case that it is notjust the alleged victim's phone thatis notjust the alleged victim's phone that is taken. when you are looking at, we had a case recently in worcester, with a cricketer whose phone wasn't taken. the victim's phone wasn't taken. the victim's phone wasn't taken. the victim's phone was taken. she went through to trial successively. his phone wasn't taken until trial successively. his phone wasn't ta ken until afterwards. when trial successively. his phone wasn't taken until afterwards. when that was example and there was a lot of misogynist, sexist text messages,
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comments that have been accessed. if you are going to do an investigation into any crime it needs to be fair and proportionate. would you be content at both phones were taken in every case? both the defendant's phone and the person making the accusation? it would be a start, more proportionate, but the system needs to change. it can be used as a fishing expedition. for example, if you were a victim of childhood sexual abuse and your phone was taken, they can go back through your records for years. when you look at rate cases already, which many, many people, one in ten people will report to the police, people don't wa nt report to the police, people don't want their social life trawled through. if you look at the way that facebook images have been used in rate cases where they have been brought out in the court process and
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people said, well, you look like you we re people said, well, you look like you were having a good time, you look like you were having fun, you didn't look like you were traumatised. that is not evidence, it is a fishing expedition and you are looking to damage somebody‘s character, it is victim blaming and not fair. have you had cases where people have decided not to proceed with an temp two prosecute someone because they don't want to go through this process you are describing, handing over their phones, details of their social media accounts to the police, oi’ social media accounts to the police, orare social media accounts to the police, or are there some people who will say if this leads to a conviction it is worthwhile? there is a lot of pressure put on people, certainly at the centre i work—out i have had people say i will not hand over my phone, this is my life, my work phone. the case i was talking about whether phone came back in eight weeks, there was a lot of pressure put on for that film to be returned. if you think about your life going
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for 12 months, you want connections oi’ for 12 months, you want connections or contracts, it does make you stop and think. we have had people saying i don't want them to access my phone, i don't want those judgments made on me. 0ver phone, i don't want those judgments made on me. over the past few years it has been used significantly by police as a measure of, and this is veryjudgmental, but police as a measure of, and this is very judgmental, but if police as a measure of, and this is veryjudgmental, but if you are not going to give us your phone, have you got something to hide? no, it is that i don't want you trolling through my phone, forming opinions, and then me having to face the consequences of that. jocelyn anderson, thank you very much for your time today. spain's socialist prime minister, pedro sanchez, is hoping to form a new government after his party emerged as the biggest winner in the general election. but he didn't get a majority and will need the support of other parties, including the left wing podemos to form a coalition.
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let's cross to tim willcox, who's in madrid. will mr sanchez returning to the centre right to form this coalition? the centre—right has ruled that out, but let's wait and see. after one of the most divisive political campaigns here, pedro sanchez is the comeback kid of the day. he was a socialist leader into previous elections where he led his party to their worst ever results. he was then kicked out by the party, went ona then kicked out by the party, went on a listening tour, he is back and will now form a coalition. probably the main bulk of the coalition will beafar the main bulk of the coalition will be a far left party. will you have to go back to the catalans? that is another question. the catalan separatism issue has been a uniting force for the right ear. talking of their rights, the centre—right party, which tagged further to the
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right, did disastrously, winning under half the seats they won in 2016. the vox party did 0k, under half the seats they won in 2016. the vox party did ok, but not as well as expected, not the political earthquake they had been predicting. for the first time since the death of francisco franco, the heart rate in spain will have a presence in parliament. this is what relief looks like. in the centre of madrid, spain's socialists celebrate their victory. their leader, the pro—european prime minister, pedro sanchez, saw off a conservative opposition which included a rising movement from the far right. translation: we made it happen. the socialist party has won the election, and in doing so, the future has won and the past has lost.
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pedro sanchez argued during the campaign that he was the only spanish leader capable of stopping the advance of the hard right. and the numbers show that he has done so. he must now form a lasting coalition of his own. the far right party, vox, the first significant movement of its kind since the end of general franco's fascist regime, four decades ago, ended up on the losing side. but they did win enough votes to enter parliament in opposition. by contrast, the winners, pedro sanchez and the socialist party, will continue to lead this country, probably in partnership with a number of smaller left—wing and regional parties. the exact shape of the new administration may take weeks to decide. james reynolds, bbc news, madrid.
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i think that is a valid point, don't hold your breath for a quick announcement for the coalition. at the end of next month there are municipal, european and regional elections. no party will want to reveal its hand in doing deals with potential political enemies and upset their core supporters before those elections. you're probably looking at a coalition in early june. talks will resume between the government and labour today, aimed at breaking the brexit deadlock. among those taking part will be the chancellor, philip hammond, and labour's shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell. it comes asjeremy corbyn is facing more pressure to commit his party to a referendum on any brexit deal. earlier, our assistant political editor, norman smith, spoke to me about whether these brexit talks will end the political deadlock. we just seem to be drifting rather aimlessly at westminster,
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with no one really clear how on earth brexit is going to be resolved, when mrs may is going to bring back her brexit deal, if there will be any breakthrough in the talks. although both sides say they are approaching the talks seriously and they have been productive, are we any closer to a breakthrough? i don't think so, because although the difference between mrs may and jeremy corbyn is not vast — mr corbyn wants a permanent customs union, mrs may is talking about a customs arrangement if there can be no other way of avoiding a hard border — the bottom line is for both leaders, the party management issues of doing a deal appear insurmountable. for mr corbyn, he would risk an uprising amongst his remain—supporting grassroots if he was to do a deal with mrs may. likewise, mrs may would risk uproar on her back benches if she was to try and push through a deal on the back of labour votes. so for that reason, i don't expect a deal this week.
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i wouldn't expect one before the european elections and to be very honest, i think the chance of any breakthrough is incredibly remote. and a big day for labour tomorrow, its ruling body meeting. what are the chances that jeremy corbyn is going to be pushed and prodded, because it seems that's what it will take, into agreeing to a second vote, a second referendum? honestly, it depends who you talk to on the labour side. those pressing for labour to commit to another referendum come what may, in other words, on any brexit deal, believe it has become a lot closer on the nec now that some of the big unions have moved in behind those pressing for another referendum, unions like the gmb, unison and usdaw, all saying they want a so—called confirmatory referendum on pretty much any brexit deal. they have also been encouraged by the fact thatjon lansman, the boss of momentum, that backsjeremy corbyn, is also sympathetic
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to a confirmatory referendum. but if you talk to team corbyn, they say, look, we have got the votes. labour leaders by and large win nec votes and mr corbyn is not going to budge. so my take is that there will be a big bust—up, at the end of which mr corbyn will emerge from the smoke by and large sticking to the existing party policy, which is that there will only be another referendum as an option on a no deal outcome or on a tory deal, but not on any brexit deal. the headlines on bbc news: victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts or risk having their case dropped spain's governing socialist party has won the most seats in the general election, but prime minister pedro sanchez‘s party doesn't have a majority and will need support from others to form a coalition.
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new plans to fund social care in england could see the over 50s forced to pay more than £300 a year extra in national insurance. in sport, alex hales has been dropped by england and feature in the world cup after being suspended following an off field incident. he has been withdrawn from all international squads. stevie chalmers, first scorer of celtic‘s winning goal in the cup final with the lisbon lions has died. raheem sterling has been named the football writers player of the year. he was also voted the pfa young player of the year. the paris wins the woman's award. more on those stories just after 11:30am.
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now returning to our top story, victims of crime, including those alleging rape, are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts or risk seeing their case dropped. here with me now is claire waxman, london's victims commissioner. what are your thoughts on the issues around this and try to balance sensitivities around victims with the need to have as much evidence as possible in a case to ensure a fair trial? what we were hearing today in the news about these consent forms, there was nothing really new. victims have been asked to share personal and sensitive information for some time. this has got worse over the last year and a half since the collapse in rate trials. it is one of the reasons why i called on the information commissioners office to lead an enquiry into the types of information that victims are being asked to consent and share in order
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to access justice. these forms today are to access justice. these forms today a re really to access justice. these forms today are really just to access justice. these forms today are reallyjust a rehash of the old stafford statements, but they are giving more information to victims as to why they are being requested to disclose information to the police and cps in order to get an access to justice and potentially a prosecution. we do need to balance the rights of the defendant, but also the rights of the victim, which i feel are also the rights of the victim, which ifeel are being also the rights of the victim, which i feel are being overlooked also the rights of the victim, which ifeel are being overlooked time also the rights of the victim, which i feel are being overlooked time and time again. victim's rights to privacy are not being upheld. why do you feel that the rights of the alleged victim, why do you think the balance as of right there? victims of rate are coming forward and reporting and most of the time are being asked to hand over their phones, even if it is not relevant, reasonable and proportionate, to give access to past health records, school records, please can speak to
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their employers. we are scrutinising victims and almost investigating them. art the defendants not being asked to hand over their phones like whites? they are, but quite often the accused will say that they don't have their pin number or they can give the information to the police. if the same happens to the victim, then they can go forward, so there will be able to get access to justice and the cps won't charge u nless justice and the cps won't charge unless they have got access to all that information. we are asking victims to disclose very personal information. if you looked at some of the information on our phones, it is the text messages, they are no different to how we use to have private conversations with friends in the coffee shop. that is being trolled through, looked at and analysed. we can look at anybody‘s past medical records, their digital data, and you could pick out
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anything that could undermine the prosecution. that is what we are seeing in the home office figures because prosecutions have plummeted. we are seeing this as limiting victim's access to justice. we need to understand what we need to look out, what is realistic, proportionate, because at the moment i think we have had this kneejerk response to the collapse rate trials undergoing on this fishing expedition and looking at so much of the information on the victim. is there a way to give the victim the greater confidence in the system? the technology the police used to look at social media accounts and look at social media accounts and look at social media accounts and look at mobile phone accounts and whether there was potentially a way for the research to be narrowed, for example, if there is one person that they are interested in, that the search only brings up any communication with that individual, either of their phone number, name, image? is there a way forward they
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are? that is what we are trying to push for, rather than taking a phone and doing a total download, which puts pressure on the police as well because it is very time consuming, thousands of pages of information. there must be aware defining the search is better —— searches much better. you are getting the consent of the third party, too. messages are coming up in the courtroom that are coming up in the courtroom that are being disclose notjust around the accused and the victim, but also third—party people as well who have not given consent for their data to be used in court, and that is very serious. thank you very much for your time. thank you very much for your time. emergency measures to ban sri lankans from covering theirfaces are coming into force on monday. the announcement said people's faces
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should be fully visible to allow identification, though the niqab and burka that muslim women wear were not mentioned specifically. a week on from the easter sunday attacks, people of every faith have been remembering those who lost their lives, praying for peace, for the safety of their country, for the recovery of the injured. many here hope the bombings, which were meant to cause divisions, will instead bring this country of 21 million people closer together. but in a move that some muslims perceived as an attack on their faith and culture, sri lankan authorities have announced they are outlawing any form of face covering that could stop people from being identified. the ban, which comes into force on monday, makes no specific mention of the niqab or burka worn by muslim women, but it does seem to be aimed at them. this could be seen as not unilateral action against these terrorist groups, but could increase these
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feelings of alienation that are already there. the government says it was responding to national security needs, but even before the attack there had been growing demand for such a ban. a week after suicide bombers detonated their devices in churches and hotels, this country is trying to return to a new normal. the sites of the attacks remain closed to the public, but the hope is that some will start to be reopened later this week. caroline rigby, bbc news. being just a few pounds overweight more than doubles the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new report being presented to the european congress on obesity. researchers studied the health of almost three million adults, and also found that those with a bmi of 40—115 had triple
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the risk of heart failure and a 50% higher risk of dying prematurely from any cause. public health england says "sustained action" is needed to tackle obesity. if you want to check your own body mass index, you can head to our website where there's a handy bmi calculator. you can check whether your weight is healthy or cause for concern, what your bmi means for you, and you can also access tips on how to stay healthy. that's all at bbc.co.uk/news or you can download the bbc news app. avengers endgame has made box office history by taking a record—breaking $1.2 billion in global ticket sales in its opening run. the disney blockbuster has become the fastest film ever to break the $1 billion barrier, doing so in just five days. endgame is the 22nd offering in the marvel studios superhero franchise.
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joining us now is our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. it isa it is a film juggernaut isn't it, really? the succession of films. people have been following these films for such a long time, this is such a big movie. that is the key attraction for so many people, people are keen to see how the section of movies will come to an amp with this film. it had some big obstacles amp with this film. it had some big o bsta cles to amp with this film. it had some big obstacles to overcome. at three hour plus running time, which means cinemas can programme as many showings in a day as they would with other films. they make less money that way. particularly in america, they have tackled that by some people have been 2a hours screenings, so cinemas stayed open 24—hour is today almost on a loop to
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audiences. they have some advantages, as well. in china, it made around $330 million, about a quarter of the total of previous movies. even without china, it would still have the record. the key thing looking forward now for people is correct do what others have done and become the biggest film of all time, cannot become the biggest film of all time, ca nnot overta ke become the biggest film of all time, cannot overtake titanic and avatar? what is it about this film, no spoilers, please, but there is that element of familiarity with the characters, but are there lots of new twists that the audience might not be expecting? i haven't seen it
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yet. i was away last week during the james bond launch injamaica. that isa james bond launch injamaica. that is a pretty good excuse! it is the way i think people are invested in the characters. unlike lots of other movies, it has had good reaction from the critics, a very good rotten tomatoes score. the best advertising for any movie is word—of—mouth and the word—of—mouth is very, very strong. people are going on social media, talking to their friends, send you really have to see this. that is what has powered so many movies to the very top. it is very easy to open a movie in some senses, you can through advertising at that, huge premiers everywhere, get people to see it in the first weekend, it is what happens after that that is crucial. it looks like this will come maintain that momentum. titanic‘s biggest weekend was for
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weekend seven, for example. it looks like it will carry on with this momentum over the coming weeks. that accolade of being the biggest box office movie of all time is definitely in sight, if not guaranteed. now it's time for a look at the weather. we have patchy rain at the moment around western england and wales, but in the east, there is drier and brighter weather. decent sunny spells coming through here and we will continue with sunshine and eastern parts of england and up into scotland. but for northern ireland, west wales on the far south—west of england, that is where you will continue to see this zone of more cloudy and damp weather. in the highlands, we could see temperatures getting up to 18 or 19 celsius. tonight, we continue with this rain across the west. it will edge
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further eastwards. more cloud and some mist and fog forming across eastern parts of scotland through parts of east yorkshire and lancashire. during tuesday, we will continue with outbreaks of rain in northern ireland. that will continue to move eastwards, pushing into western scotland, west wales and the south—west of england. elsewhere, sunny spells and feeling a bit warmer. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts. campaigners fear it could discourage victims from coming forward, but a man who was falsely accused says it's a good idea. if my phone gets taken as a defendant, then it should be that the complaina nt‘s phone also gets taken, just to conduct a thorough investigation, i suppose. otherwise, it always seems to be unsafe if you convict
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somebody, but you don't have all the information that you should have had. spain's governing socialist party has won the most seats in the general election — but prime minister pedro sanchez‘s party doesn't have a majority and will need support from others to form a coalition. new plans to fund social care in england could see the over—fifties forced to pay on average, more than £300 a year extra in national insurance. sport now, here's hugh ferris. good morning. alex hales has been excluded from england's world cup plans after an off—field incident led to him being suspended. the batsman has been withdrawn from all international squads, including their preliminary 15 man party for the tournament which starts at the end of may. in a statement ecb managing director
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ashley giles said: the former celtic player stevie chalmers has died at the age of 83. chalmers scored the winning goalfor celtic in the 1967 european cup final against inter milan in portugal. the team were later dubbed the lisbon lions. his passing follows the death of another member of the team — billy mcneil — last week. raheem sterling has been named the football writers association player of the year. the manchester city forward took the award with 62% of the vote after he was named the players' young player of the year...
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and is the first city player to win since 1969. the pfa player of the year virgil van dijk was second. and the writers differed from the players in the women's award too. nikita parris, also of manchester city... has won the fwa prize. she beat the pfa winner vivianne miedema byjust one vote. staying with manchester city, who climbed back to the top of the premier league after a narrow 1—0 win at burnley. city eventually found the breakthrough after sergio aguero's shotjust about crossed the line — confirmed using goal line technology. they're a point above liverpool with two games remaining; if they beat leicester and brighton, they will retain the title. replays showjust how close it was — a shade under 3cm over the line. these kind of games, you play with attention to what will happen at the end of the season. but it's incredible. it's the same we said last month, it's in our hands. we have to win our two games. the next one against leicester.
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third and fourth is as hard to call as first and second. manchester united and chelsea both still have a chance of qualifying for the champions league after a 1—1 draw at old trafford. it featured yet another mistake from david de gea. united are 3 points off the top 4 with 2 games left. arsenal's hopes of making the top four took another knock... they lost 3—0 at leicester. jamie vardy scored twice after arsenal went down to ten men when ainsley maitland—niles was sent off in the first half. sheffield united have been promoted to the premier league after leeds failed to beat aston villa in a game that included one of the most bizarre passages of play you're ever likely to see. leeds went ahead with around 20 minutes to go through mateusz klich, but chaos ensued afterwards with aston villa players and staff angry that leeds hadn't stopped with a villa player down injured. leeds boss marcelo bielsa then told his players to allow aston villa to score. it finished in a 1—1 draw. both teams will be in the playoffs.
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following that closely at brammall lane were the sheffield united players. these were the scenes when the final whistle went at elland road to confirm the blades' promotion back to the premier league for the first time since 2007. there might be a few sore heads in south yorkshire this morning! celtic have been made to wait at least another week before they can win the scottish premiership. that's after second placed rangers beat aberdeen 2—0 at ibrox. rangers secured victory with two penalties from james tavernier. hibs and hearts remain in 5th and 6th after they drew one each at easter road in the edinburgh derby. that's all the sport for now, bit don't forget the world snooker championship resumes at1o' clock this afternoon across the bbc, with the second round matches between kyren wilson and barry hawkins and ali carter and zhou yuelong reaching their conclusion.
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you can watch those live on the bbc sport website. next month will see the publication of the first part of the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse in the church of england. and an investigation by the bbc‘s panorama programme into past cases of abuse in the diocese of lincoln has revealed that in 2015, the diocese gave the police a list of dozens of names of concern, as jane corbyn reports. in the 1960s, roy griffiths was a deputy head teacher at lincoln cathedral school. last year, he was jailed after he admitted sexually abusing six boys while he worked there. one of them was kevin bennington, who now lives in canada. roy griffiths abused him repeatedly before he was 13. speaking publicly for the first time, kevin now knows he was not alone. he would bath us and he would have us naked sitting
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watching the television. in return, i suppose, we would get treats and candy. kevin says his mother complained to lincoln diocese in 1969, when griffiths tried to abuse him on a school trip to scotland. but the diocese did not tell the police for another 45 years. should have been dealt with right away, and... the church should have instructed the police for him being a paedophile. and they didn't. they just. .. turned a blind eye and moved on. roy griffiths was convicted following an investigation by lincolnshire police. they became aware of him in 2015, after the diocese of lincoln handed them a list of names of concern. panorama can now reveal that dozens of names were on the list. there were 53 names on the first list. it was a surprise, to say the least, the number of names that were there. not all the names are related to alleged child abuse.
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we whittled it down to about 25 names, whereby we either knew that they had committed offences or there was some issue around risk to members of the public from them. some of the names given to the police could have been referred earlier by the diocese as part of a national review of church of england files in 2008 and 2009. lincoln diocese said in a statement that past matters have not been handled well and it was committed to learning from mistakes. it apologised it took so long forjustice to be served. what i hope will be increasingly understood is that if survivors and victims of abuse wish to come forward, what they need is a response from the church that is compassionate, that is fair, that is appropriate, and that is swift. the investigation means kevin is now finally able to reveal a secret he has kept for decades. i never told my children. they didn't really know anything about this until the contact with police. do you think your life
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would have been different if this hadn't happened? more than likely, it probably would have been different. i could have been a totally different person. survivors say the church needs to be more open about the number of abuse cases in its past, to help rebuild trust shattered by decades of hidden child abuse. jane corbyn, bbc news. you can see the whole panorama report tonight at 8:30pm, on bbc one. after weeks of protests about the impact of climate change, taking better care of the soil could be one answer to cutting emissions. a major global report suggests soil quality is becoming poorer, which not only reduces our ability to grow crops, but also releases carbon into the atmosphere, adding to global warming. here's our environment analyst, roger harrabin. soil erosion — a double problem. here in the east of england,
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this isn't smog in the air. it is soil, on a hot, windy day. losing soil like this lowers our ability to grow crops. it also releases carbon trapped in the earth, and that contributes to climate change. in parts of the south of england, some carelessly farmed fields are steadily running into the rivers. soil degradation is a problem said to affect almost half the world's people. look at this tsunami of dust last year in phoenix, arizona. it is the result of a spectacular storm. for most farmers, soil loss is a creeping problem that is only noticed too late. soils are really important for climate change, as well, because they store a lot of carbon. there's three times more carbon stored in soil than there actually is in the atmosphere. so you imagine, if all that carbon was released from the soil into the atmosphere, we'd have — this is the runaway climate change that people are concerned about. so what to do? well, we know cows' burps
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are a problem for climate change, but their dung also helps put carbon back into the soil. so this mobile dairy in the south of england may prove part of a solution. it means cows spread their dung across the fields, not leave it in the farmyard. that way, nutrients and carbon from the pasture return to the soil. we were worried that the soil was becoming dead. there was no vitality in the soil, there was no resilience in the soil. so we realised we need to put grass back into the system, and to manage the grass, we've brought in dairy cows. here is the evidence. this field, with its light, stony soil, is depleted from crops grown with chemical fertilisers. see the much darker, carbon—rich soil in the far ploughed field, previously fertilised by cows. the simplest way of combating climate change and improving the soil is to turn all this farmland into woodland. but that wouldn't feed the people, would it? perhaps a form of farming like this
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can be gentler on the environment, while keeping milk on the table. we've got to radically cut the number of cattle on earth, scientists tell us. is there a role for pasture—fed cows like these, that burp out methane but also help the soil? we don't have a clear answer yet. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts or risk having their case dropped. spain's governing socialist party has won the most seats in the general election — but prime minister pedro sanchez‘s party doesn't have a majority and will need support from others to form a coalition. new plans to fund social care in england could see the over 50s forced to pay on average, more than £300 a year extra in national insurance.
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in the business news: fewer british holiday—makers have booked a summer holiday inside the european union this year amid continuing brexit uncertainty, that's according to holiday firm thomas cook. it says almost half of the holidays it sold up until the end of february were to non—eu destinations, up 10% last year. boeing's chief executive is set to face shareholders later for the first time since the second of two fatal crashes involving the firm's 737 max plane which killed a total of 346 people. dennis muilenburg will have to try to boost confidence in the plane—maker after a difficult two months. nearly a third of graduates have more education than is required for the job they were doing in 2017. the latest figures from the office for national statistics, show the incidence of overeducation was highest in the 25—34 and 35—49 age groups. the data also show that overeducation was not a short—term phenomenon, with 29.2% of graduates still overeducated for their current
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role five years after graduation. britain's economy will be feeling the impact of brexit on growth for the rest of this year, that's according to leading economic forecaster the ey item club. it says the drag on growth will stop the bank of england from raising interest rates when it meets on thursday. the ey item club also says economic growth has been artificially high thanks to a rise in stockpiling by firms preparing for a no—deal brexit. mark gregory is ey‘s chief economist explain what the impact on uk growth has been of the brexit uncertainty we have seen? the main change since our last forecast in january has been the brexit end date moving again and more uncertainty remains,
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so business investment continues to disappoint. that is what is dragging down the growth forecasts. how much of that is also the global growth slowdown we have been seen? of that is also the global growth slowdown we have been seemm of that is also the global growth slowdown we have been seen? it is clearly not just one factor. slowdown we have been seen? it is clearly notjust one factor. brexit is part of the story. there are challenges in the global economy. but on balance, it is more due to the brexit uncertainty than the global slowdown. and that uncertainty is set to continue. what impact do you think that will have? again, we see growth of 1.3% were historically, the uk has over 2%. so you can see the drag from uncertainty is significant. you were talking about the impact stockpiling. explain to me what the impact that stockpiling has had on growth figures so far. it has certainly added to growth. in the last quarter of last year, growth was around 0.2%. we think it could be 0.4 in the first quarter and a big part of that difference will be from stockpiling, companies buying
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more than they need just in case they have problems in the future. so how big a correction are we going to get? again, with the uncertainty, one imagines that there will be a gradual one down of those stocks, so that could take away most of what it addedin that could take away most of what it added in the first quarter. so we might see that in a second or third quarter. and the bank of england is having its monthly meeting this week. we expect a decision on the cost of borrowing. do we now expect a delay in rate rises because of this? yes. i think the bank will adopt a wait—and—see policy. there is in such inflationary pressure that requires immediate action, so they will wait and see what happens over the next few months. mark gregory, thank you. let's go through some of the other stories making headlines. wealthier homeowners should be asked to make a voluntary payment of up to £30,000
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for their care needs in old age, a new report argues. the centre for policy studies proposes a system in which everyone receives a state—funded weekly care payment. those able to downsize or release equity from their homes would also be encouraged to contribute more to plug the current funding 93p- avengers: endgame has made box office history by taking a record—breaking $1.2bn (£929m) in global ticket sales in its opening run. the disney blockbuster has become the fastest film ever to break the $1bn barrier, doing so in just five days. its opening takings smashed the previous global debut record of $640m set by last year's avengers: infinity war. chancellor philip hammond will this week rule on the future of 1p and 2p coins, a year after he called them "obsolete". in his spring statement in 2018, a treasury consultation about the mix of coins in circulation appeared to pave the way for the end of both of them. a swift reverse by the prime minister's official spokesman declared there were no plans
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to scrap the copper coins. it will be interesting to hear what the chancellor has to say later this week. let's take you through what the markets are doing briefly. european shares fell on monday as spanish markets took a hit on uncertainty related to a government formation post, the country's general election and weak eurozone economic sentiment that exacerbated fears over slowing global growth. that's all the business news. liverpool university has apologised and said it's conducting a review of its policies after it was revealed that disabled students at the university had been charged for long—term extensions to their assignments because of ill—health. the victoria derbyshire programme spoke to two students who were charged a total of £250 pounds each for two extensions. alex gatenby has been to meet them.
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i'm locked out of my university account, because i've been charged for an extension and i can't pay for the charge at the moment. so i've got no access to my emails, no access to documents for my dissertation. we have learned that the university of liverpool has been charging disabled students who require long term extensions to their assignments because of ill health. this happened to students felicity and kayley, who have mental and physical health conditions. the invoice said £50 for each of us. this was for the first three month extension that we both got. following this first charge, they were both granted a second extension, but once again faced another bill, this time for £200. we've raised their complaint with the university, who now say that they are reviewing charging for extensions. they also pointed out that despite her accepted extension due to her health condition, kayley is not registered with them as a disabled student.
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but these deadline charges are just one of the concerns i found about disability support at liverpool university. nanna has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair, and she's struggled with accessibility at liverpool. so how many times have you now been scheduled into rooms that are inaccessible to you? about five to six times. when i have been scheduled into lecture theatres so you can't actually see any of the lecture notes? the university of liverpool have now
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apologised for the timetabling of lectures in inaccessible rooms. they have also removed the frosted glass. her experience is not an isolated case. ijust got her experience is not an isolated case. i just got to her experience is not an isolated case. ijust got to a stage where i was so angry at the university for not helping me. julia has the connective tissue disorder, which causes her chronic pain. during a number of exams, julia has required adjustments such as the use of an ergonomic chair, were not put in place. physically a test of my pain tolerance and not my academic ability. the university of liverpool told us that they are committed to fulfilling their obligations under the equality act, but they accept that there are occasions where they have fallen short and say they will involve disabled students more regularly in the decision—making process going forward.
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more than 6,000 people have been forced out of their homes near the canadian city of montreal because of rising floodwater. a combination of melting snow and heavy rainfall has aslo led to the capital 0ttowa declaring a state of emergency. donna larsen has the details. this is the result of heavy rains and melting snow. spring flooding in eastern canada has already affected thousands of people and properties. this dam at bell falls in quebec is dangerously over capacity and authorities have ordered anybody down river to evacuate, but such warnings came too late for the residents of one town near montreal, where more than 6,500 people were forced to leave their homes after floodwaters breached a dyke, sending a five—foot surge of water crashing through the area. the canadian capital 0ttawa and montreal are among the places
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which have declared states of emergency. and hundreds of soldiers have been deployed to the hardest—hit regions as residents do what they can to shore up their houses. my basement is currently flooding because the power is out as of today. my backyard is flooding too because there's a swamp back there, so i'm pretty much surrounded except for a little bit in the front. canada's prime minister has visited some of the affected areas, even filling up sandbags, but it will take more than a carefully planned photocall to solve the problem, whichjustin trudeau says is a result of climate change. with climate change, we're going to see more and more of these extreme weather events more regularly. we need to think about adaptation, mitigation and how we will move forward together. in some places, the floodwaters are now starting to recede, enabling people to assess the damage, but with more rain forecast over the coming days, others can
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only watch and wait. donna larsen, bbc news, quebec. now it's time for a look at the weather. apologies, i think simon has a microphone issue. let's try again. yes, can you hear me? i wasjust saying we had dramatic images from canada, but what's happening here? sorry about that. we have cloud towards western areas of the uk. that is bringing some outbreaks of rain but for many of us at the moment, it is dry and bright, plenty of sunny spells. that is the scene at the moment in birmingham. look at the green trees. for the rest of the day, we continue with reigning south—west england into west wales and across northern ireland. elsewhere, sunshine will be continuing. perhaps cloud around the eastern areas in the afternoon.
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through tonight, we will see a bit of cloud returning across eastern areas of scotland down the eastern side of england, and we will continue with that rain affecting northern ireland. that will gradually work its way further eastwards. going to tuesday, for most it will be another dry day. there will be some cloud in the morning across eastern parts. there will be sunny spells developing here. increasing cloud across western scotland, wales and the south—west of england, with patchy rain starting to move in. but temperature was during tuesday, it will be higher for temperature was during tuesday, it will be higherfor many. —— temperature—wise. 0n will be higherfor many. —— temperature—wise. on wednesday, we have a cold front moving through bringing cooler air. but it is this
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cold front with arctic air behind it that will move in from the end of the week, turning much chillier. but during wednesday, patchy rain will move from west to east across england, wales and across scotland. brighter skies towards the east of that weather front. behind that cold front, it will be cooler during wednesday. during thursday, there will be some rain and showers affecting the western areas. it should be drierfor many affecting the western areas. it should be drier for many of us. affecting the western areas. it should be drierfor many of us. on friday, temperatures will start to drop down. it will continue to stay chilly into the bank holiday weekend, but at the moment it is looking mostly dry. bye—bye.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories: victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts, but campaigners say it could discourage people from coming forward. we do need to balance the rights of the defendant, but also the rights of the victim which i feel are being overlooked time and time again through this process and that victim's rights to privacy are not being upheld. victim's rights to privacy are not being upheld. spain's governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election, but prime minister pedro sanchez will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. new proposals to fund social care in england could see the over 50s forced to pay more than £300 a year extra in national insurance. poor quality soil is releasing carbon into the atmosphere and adding to global warming,
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according to a major report a box office smash — avengers endgame makes history by taking a record—breaking $1.2 billion in global ticket sales in its opening run. good afternoon. it's 29th april. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm anita mcveigh. victims of crime, including those alleging rape, are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts or risk seeing their case dropped. the move, which applies to england and wales, is part of measures revealed by the director of public prosecutions to address failures in the disclosure of evidence to defendants. but campaigners say it could discourage victims from going ahead with prosecutions. our legal correspondent clive coleman reports.
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the case of liam allan, falsely accused of rape and sexual assault, starkly exposed the problems of police and prosecutors failing to disclose relevant evidence to the defence. disclosure is the foundation of ourfair trial system. the prosecution must disclose evidence gathered by police which either helps the defence case or weakens its own. if that fails, miscarriages of justice can occur. following several collapsed trials, a series of reviews revealed a system—wide problem. at its core was the ability of police and prosecutors to get on top of unprecedented amounts of digital evidence on smart phones and social media. under a national disclosure improvement plan, all cps prosecutors and 93,000 police staff have received specialist training. disclosure champions have been appointed and management systems used for years in complex terrorism cases are now being used in all rape cases.
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but most controversial are new forms, under which victims and witnesses are asked if they'll consent to have their smart phones examined. if they don't, it might halt a prosecution. it is neitherfor an investigating police officer, nor a prosecuting lawyer, to simply speculatively have a look at the content of a mobile phone or a laptop computer. that is not what we're asking. that is not what the consent forms are there for. no—one's pretending disclosure's easy, but if police and prosecutors can't reassure the public that they can obtain relevant digital evidence and pass that which is helpful to the defence, the future of our fair trial system is in jeopardy. clive coleman, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to claire waxman, who is london's victims commissioner. she told me her thoughts on the issues surrounding this new policy.
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what we're hearing today in the news around these new consent forms, there is nothing really new. victims have been asked to share very personal and sensitive information, victims of rape, for some time. this has got worse over the last year and a half after we saw the collapsed rape trials. and it is one of the reasons why i called on the information commissioners office to lead an enquiry, and it is their top enquiry and investigation into the types of information that victims are being asked to consent and share in order to access justice. these forms today are really just a rehash of the old stafford statements but they are giving a bit more information to victims of why they are being requested to disclose information to the police and cps in order to access justice and potentially a prosecution. yes, you are right, we do need to balance the rights of the defendant but also the rights of the victim which i feel are being overlooked time and time again through this process, and that victims' rights to privacy
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are not being upheld. a former government minister has proposed funding social care in england in a similar manner to the state pension. the conservative mp damian green believes wholesale changes are needed to ensure the system remains fair and adequately funded. the move could force over over—50s in england to pay an average of more than £300 a year extra in national insurance contributions. here's our social affairs correspondent alison holt. with more of us living longer, the demand from people needing help with day—to—day tasks like eating, getting dressed and washed, is increasing. councils that provide that support have also had their budgets cut. it means the care system's under huge pressure. today's report says the need for reform is urgent, to provide a safety net which will end the lottery of who gets state—funded care and who doesn't. the report calls for a nationally—funded pension—style scheme. it proposes a universal care entitlement to provide anyone who needs it with a decent
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standard of help. people would pay a care supplement on top if they wanted a more expensive level of support. the report also says the underfunding of the current care system must be tackled. we need universal care provision that is better than it is now so it will involve spending more taxpayers' money. we will need to find about £2.5 billion extra per year. on top of that, we need to allow people to, if they can, and many people can, particularly if they own property, they will be able to increase, buy an insurance policy or something like an annuity that will, when it's all pooled together, put a lot more money into the system. the government says it has put extra money into social care and plans for the future will be published at the earliest opportunity. alison holt, bbc news.
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let's return to our top story, that victims of crime are being asked by police to give them access to their films or social media accounts, or the risk of their case not proceeding. the risk of their case not proceeding. here with me today is nick ephgrave, the national police chiefs' council's lead for criminal justice. we have heard a lot of criticism from groups who work with victims of crime, particularly sexual offences, and campaigners concerned about privacy. what do you say to them about these concerns? the first thing i would say is i understand exactly that perspective and it is important we do trample over the rights of an individual to have privacy, of course not, that's a fundamental right. it is also the case that we as an investigative authority need to fulfil our
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obligations under disclosure law, which means that we do need sometimes, not in every case i stress, but on occasion we need to understand what might be on our victim's mobile phone or other digital device we can ascertain that there is material there that will either undermine our case, or potentially assess the case of the defence. we can't avoid that responsibility, it is written into legislation and it would be difficult to see how you could achieve that without asking the victim what is on their phone or other device. that is what these forms have been designed to do. that is chiefly i would imagine if the alleged victim and suspect know one another. what about this idea that failure to give consent to access phone or social media records might lead to that case being dropped? phone or social media records might lead to that case being dropped7m that happening? it's not happening very much at all. but it is a very real risk. you have to consider it
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in the round. if there was a reasonable enquiry to be made regarding theatre on a phone, and the person who owns the phone is not willing to allow police to look at that, we have to disclose that fact to the crown prosecution service. the cps would then take a view over whether or not that case, in the absence of that information, would be likely to succeed. it is possible they could come to the view that wouldn't be. not in every case, every circumstance is different, but there is that risk, which is we wa nted there is that risk, which is we wanted to alert alerts victims too. what can you say to victims or alleged victims that have police look on the phone or social media, that this isn'tjust look on the phone or social media, that this isn't just a fishing exercise, that they are not looking at everything that is there, but specifically adds information
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relating to an individual, whether thatis relating to an individual, whether that is photographed, a name, phone number. that is exactly the approach we take. we don't have the resource to look at everything on a typical mobile phone were more than one device. the actual approach that is taken is one of a reasonable enquiry, so we need to understand the circumstances of the case, we need to understand what particular material we might be looking for and then focus your search on that and that the loan. to do anything else would be wrong. what do you say to people who are unsure whether to come forward, whether to give their consent to use this material? what is going on in terms of police training and use of technology to try to give assurances around privacy? the trimming element is a significant piece of work. we have engaged on a huge training exercise right across the uk around disclosure and the obligations are police officers have. in terms of
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technology, whilst currently there is not a single solution that any police force can use, we are piloting a number of technological search engine type tools which may assist officers being very specific in what they are looking for, to allow the search to take a much less time than it currently does. i would say to anyone out there who thinks they may be a victim of any type of crime, notjust of a sexual nature, you can trust the police to investigate it diligently and thoroughly. we will not be conducting a speculative search on every device that you own. it may be the case, depending on the circumstances, that we look at some elements on your phone or mobile device because we are obliged to do so. are you doing any outreach, if you like, with groups that work with victims? yes, we are. when we wanted to devise a national form that was consistently engaged with a number of groups and statutory bodies to ta ke of groups and statutory bodies to take their views into account, in
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terms of what the form looks like, the type of information be put in there and the language we use. that outreach continues. i am the way saying that these forms are perfect on the finished article. we are a lwa ys on the finished article. we are always willing to take on constructive criticism to try and improve them. it is in all our interest to try and get these forms as useful as they can be. thank you very much for your time today. we are seeing some comment from the prime minister's official spokesperson on this matter. asked about whether rate victims should ha ndfuls to about whether rate victims should handfuls to the police, the prime minister's official spokesperson said it is a complex area and well disclosure can be a key component in ensuring afair disclosure can be a key component in ensuring a fair trial, you can also bea ensuring a fair trial, you can also be a source of anxiety. the spokesperson said that the police understand the need to balance our respect privacy with the need to provide pursue all reasonable lines of enquiry and the cps will work
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with the information commissioner to ensure the right approach is being taken. they went on to say we want victims to have the confidence to come forward and report crimes knowing they will get the support they need and that everything will be done to bring offenders to justice. spain's socialist prime minister, pedro sanchez, is hoping to form a new government, after his party emerged as the biggest winner in the general election. but he didn't get a majority, and will need the support of other parties. let's cross to tim willcox, who's in madrid. it isa it is a very complex picture there. when can we expect to hear news of any developments? it will take several weeks, anita. pedro sanchez‘s party got 120 seats, they need to hundred and 76 to get a
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majority in congress. they can count ona hard majority in congress. they can count on a hard left party, they have 42, that takes them to 165. they need another 11. he could go to the basque party, they have six or seven. there are some other small independent parties as well from valencia and things like that. he might have to go to the catalans. the catalan separatism issue was one of the rallying calls for the right ear, including the hard rates vox party, who felt too much and given to the autonomous regions. they want to the autonomous regions. they want to rein that talking of the right wing, vox did not do as well as expected. they got 24 seats. the traditionally party of the right here in the old 2—party system, they
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did appallingly, only getting 66. they got 137 last time round in 2016. this coalition will take maybe a month to form, we believe. after this country's third vote in four years, after this country's third vote in fouryears, spain after this country's third vote in four years, spain has a winner. voters pick their way through a collection of fractured parties and give the governing socialist party more seats than any other group. this is what relief looks like. in the centre of madrid, spain's socialists celebrate their victory. their leader, the pro—european prime minister, pedro sanchez, saw off a conservative opposition which included a rising
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movement from the far right. translation: we made it happen. the socialist party has won the election, and in doing so, the future has won and the past has lost. pedro sanchez argued during the campaign that he was the only spanish leader capable of stopping the advance of the hard right. and the numbers show that he has done so. he must now form a lasting coalition of his own. we have seen different things in the world. we've seen trump in the states. we've seen different things. we've seen brexit, i'm sorry! sometimes you have to get together and say this is what we once. and you don't want those things, you don't want trump or brexit? 0h you don't want those things, you don't want trump or brexit? oh my god, no. we don't want frankel to come back, those old ideas, sol think it is a good thing to be here tonight and to support our president.
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the far right party, vox, the first significant movement of its kind since the end of general franco's fascist regime, four decades ago, ended up on the losing side. but they did win enough votes to enter parliament in opposition. translation: we now have a voice in congress and we can tell everyone in spain that we are here to say. —— here to stay. by contrast, the winners, pedro sanchez and the socialist party, will continue to lead this country, probably in partnership with a number of smaller left—wing and regional parties. the exact shape of the new administration may take weeks to decide. james reynolds, bbc news, madrid. another reason why that coalition might take several weeks if not months to form is coming up at the end of next month in spain, regional, european and local elections. all parties will not want to upset their base by doing deals
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with rival parties or parties that hitherto happen seen eye to eye with each other for political pragmatism. soi each other for political pragmatism. so i think that is another reason why i don't envisage an official coalition being formed here until probably the beginning ofjune. back to you. the headlines on bbc news: victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts or face seeing their case dropped. spain's governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election, but prime minister pedro sanchez will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. new proposals to fund social care in england could see the over—50s forced to pay more than £300 a year extra in national insurance. sport now, here's hugh ferris.
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good afternoon. alex hales has been excluded from engalnd's world cup plans after an off—field incident led to him being suspended. the batsman has been withdrawn from all international squads, including their preliminary 15 man party for the tournament which starts at the end of may. in a statement, ecb managing director ashley managing director ashley giles said: we need to consider what is in the best interests of the team, to ensure they are free from any distractions and able to (ani) focus distractions and able to focus on being successful on the pitch. this is not the end of alex's career as an england player. the ecb and the pca will continue to aid alex and work alongside his county club nottinghamshire to give him the support he needs. alex hales has had a number of chances along the way and he has found a way with too much regularity now of shooting himself in the
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first. you dream as a cricketer of playing for your country, if you are a one—day cricketer you dream of playing in the world cup and know that dream has been shattered. it is a crossroads for alex hales. will he not really knuckle down and get himself back on track? the former celtic player stevie chalmers has died at the age of 83. chalmers scored the winning goalfor celtic in the 1967 european cup final against inter milan in portugal. the team were later dubbed the ‘lisbon lions'. his passing follows the death of another member of the team, billy mcneil, last week. raheem sterling has been named the football writers asscitaion player of the year. the manchester city forward took the award with 62% of the vote after he was named the players' young player of the year, and is the first city player to win since 1969. the pfa player of the year virgil van dijk was second. and the writers differed from the players in the women's award too. nikita parris, also of manchester city, has won the fwa prize.
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she beat the pfa winner vivianne miedema byjust one vote. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. this look at the crucible begins at one o'clock this afternoon. it is on bbc television and on the website. that's all for me for now. being just a few pounds overweight more than doubles the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new report being presented to the european congress on obesity. researchers studied the health of almost three million adults, and also found that those with a bmi of 40 to 45 had triple the risk of heart failure and a 50% higher risk of dying prematurely from any cause. public health england says "sustained action" is needed to tackle obesity.
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naveed sattar is professor of metabolic medicine at the university of glasgow. he's an expert in diabetes and heart disease and hejoins me now. this research is clearly substantial, almost 3 million adults, so it gives us a really good base to talk about this. we are not really hearing anything that we haven't heard before, are we? you are correct. some reports have been even bigger and have suggested even higher risks than this particular report. this is nothing new. the site is it, the fact it is an international conference reaffirms that obesity carries many risks across the whole of the medical profession. what it does is remind us profession. what it does is remind us again of these risks. perhaps thatis us again of these risks. perhaps that is what is needed, a constant drip, drip of information out there
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reminding us that this is what happens or these are the risks, if we are overweight. yes, but i think we are overweight. yes, but i think we need to be better than that. we are at the point in the medical profession where there is a tool box ofa number of profession where there is a tool box of a number of things that help people lose weight in an evidence—based manner. people lose weight in an evidence-based manner. we need to be more prescriptive with our patients, be more sympathetic. it is not easy to lose weight. more people than perhaps they realise with some small sustainable changes, with proper advice, which is much more prescriptive, can make changes that will lead them to lose a few kilograms or salute their weight gain or stop their weight gain. that prevents the likelihoods of developing these diseases later in life. that is the thing we need to focus on, helping our patients in a more informed way. what are the key changes that are sustainable?”
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think the messages are, for example, ifi think the messages are, for example, if i take some of my clinic patient for example, some of them get at themselves, they realise for example that their problem is eating too much chocolate. they don't eat much vegetable or fruit. with a bit of encouragement and being prescriptive, i can tell them they can enjoy fruit and veg if they give themselves enough time to get adapted to those tests, start to enjoy their food better. adapted to those tests, start to enjoy theirfood better. by adapted to those tests, start to enjoy their food better. by that process , enjoy their food better. by that process, condoned the amount of chocolate that they eat so they have other healthier alternatives. i have been that journey, other healthier alternatives. i have been thatjourney, many listeners, maybe you yourself have been through it, cutting sugar from a tea or coffee, retraining our taste buds. all the things that we know. itjust ta kes a all the things that we know. itjust takes a little bit of time, a bit of patience, a bit of effort. most people can go on a journey of diet
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that make small sustainable changes and gets to the point where they can enjoy their diets even more than the food used to. people understand what the healthy foods are. we need to be more prescriptive, we need to tell people what they can do. one thing might work for some person, for other people it might be a range of things. there is the story around today that tea is just as enjoyable without sugar. i used to have two teaspoons cumin i have half. i'm the same. i could probably lose that as well, quite frankly. this is the sort of magic question, almost. how do you get people to the point where if you say they can retrain their palate, how do you get them to the point where they stick with the change long enough to make it become a habit, a new habit, are better habits? that is a very good point.
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this is an area where we do need more research. if i was to step back, the food environment will change quick enough to make a big impact. the sugar tax is having a modest effect. we need to help educate the public better. in terms of retraining the palate, it isa terms of retraining the palate, it is a matter of persistence and time. as an example, i can talk about myself and some patients, i didn't used to like fibre cereals, but now ido like used to like fibre cereals, but now i do like shredded wheat. i will add some fruits, but in the past when i was growing up i used to eat frosty is, for example. retraining your palate, and it doesn't need to be one foodstuff, people can retrain their palates for a range of different foods and environments, whether it is fruit and veg, different types of cereal, brown bread as opposed to white bread,
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healthy meats, etc. itjust takes a bit of time and it is trial and errorfor most people. bit of time and it is trial and error for most people. we need to give people the encouragement to try, to fail, and to try again. to find a healthy test that they like. it just takes a find a healthy test that they like. itjust takes a bit of time and effort. we haven't done that with our patient yet. many health care interactions do not talk about died ina interactions do not talk about died in a prescriptive way that gives people the choice, a menu of options, and that is where we need to head. for some other people it may not be enough and then may then need to be referred to commercial weight loss professionals. we are upping ourgame in weight loss professionals. we are upping our game in the health profession, we can do even better and this will help us motivate people. thank you very much for your time today. retraining your palate is the way to go.
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if you want to check your own body mass index, you can head to our website, where there's a handy bmi calculator. you can check whether your weight is healthy or cause for concern, what your bmi means for you and you can also access tips on how to stay healthy. that's all at bbc.co.uk/news or you can download the bbc news app. fewer british holiday—makers have booked a summer holiday inside the european union this year, amid continuing brexit uncertainty. that's according to holiday firm thomas cook. it says almost half of the holidays it sold up until the end of february were to non—eu destinations, up 10% on last year. let's get more on this with simon calder, who's the independent‘s travel editor. hejoins me from morecambe. that's a modest increase, but spain
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is still the biggest destination. yes, it probably always will be because it is as a nice short flight time. what is significant is the way that we are flying further in order to get better value. all the signs are that you have two uncertainties going on. the first one is what is going on. the first one is what is going on. the first one is what is going on with brexit, shall be not commit to anything? the other one that has a bit of sense to it is we don't know what will be going on in the euro area, but if we book a holiday outside the euro area it will go ahead as normal. yes, we have seen an increase of 24% in the non—euro zone area countries from thomas cook. turkey has overtaken greece as the second most popular country greece as the second most popular cou ntry after greece as the second most popular country after spain and we also have
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tunisia, egypt and other non—euro destination is doing pretty well. so a closer destination doesn't automatically equal less expense, and along the whole destination the opposite. people are perceiving that anyway. it is all to do with currency because the pound slumped against the euro and us dollar when the eu referendum took place. it has been bumbling along at about one fifth lower than it was the day before the referendum. that means that things are significantly more expensive, but once you get to destinations like turkey, even though the flying time is significantly further, for instance from manchester to alica nte significantly further, for instance from manchester to alicante is about two and a bit hours, to turkey it is four hours, so you are flying further, spending more, causing more
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pollution, i'm afraid, but getting the value you get in all—inclusive resorts, particularly, is higher. the other strong trend we are sent with thomas cook and other tour operators is that people are going much more for all—inclusive holidays. two out of three holidays sold by thomas cook are all inclusive. you knew what the cost is going to be and you will not get any shocks when you get the credit card bill six weeks after your holiday. simon, thank you. perhaps people might be waiting to closer to the summer holidays to find out what the weather forecast will be making a last—minute decision. we can only focus on the here and now, can't we, helen? yes, it is not looking too bad or too dissimilar. it was greyer in some eastern areas, a little bit of mist and fog which
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will linger but the vast majority are seeing a lot of sunshine. it is quite grey down three parts of the central lowlands. we have got the potential for a shower across eastern areas and rain still lingering, patchy rain over northern ireland and the far west of england and wales. the vast majority is decent weather with temperatures higher than yesterday, the winds are lighter. 20 degrees potential in the highlands of scotland. it looks decentin highlands of scotland. it looks decent in the east and scotland tomorrow. further west the rain taps up tomorrow. further west the rain taps upfor tomorrow. further west the rain taps up for northern ireland and that will push into scotland. further east, fog and some chilly night cannot be ruled out but a decent day in eastern areas. temperatures responding to that strong april sunshine but not across the west. i will have more detail in half an hour.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts, but campaigners say it could discourage people from coming forward. we need to balance the rights of the defendant but also the rights of the victim which i feel are being overlooked time and time again through this process and victims rights to privacy are not being upheld. spain's governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election — but prime minister pedro sanchez will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. new proposals to fund social care in england could see the over 50s forced to pay more than 300—pounds a year extra in national insurance. emergency measures to ban sri lankans from covering theirfaces are coming into force on monday. the announcement said people's faces
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should be fully visible to allow identification — though the niqab and burka that muslim women wear were not mentioned specifically. caroline rigby reports. a week on from the easter sunday attacks, people of every faith have been remembering those who lost their lives, praying for peace, for the safety of their country, for the recovery of the injured. many here hope the bombings, which were meant to cause divisions, will instead bring this country of 21 million people closer together. but in a move that some muslims perceived as an attack on their faith and culture, sri lankan authorities have announced they are outlawing any form of face covering that could stop people from being identified. the ban, which comes into force on monday, makes no specific mention of the niqab or burka worn by muslim women, but it does seem to be aimed at them. there is a danger with this kind of
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act that it could be seen as a unilateral action targeting not these violent fringe groups that committed the attacks but muslims at large. that could add to feelings of prejudice and alienation that are already there. the president said it was responding to national security needs before the attack there had been growing demand for such a ban. a week after suicide bombers detonated their devices in churches and hotels, this country is trying to return to a new normal. the sites of the attacks remain closed to the public, but the hope is that some will start to be reopened later this week. caroline rigby, bbc news. now, this week, in the build—up to the local elections we're visiting our newsrooms around england to hear more about the issues. not the new swims but getting out and about. any moment i will be
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talking to dan 0'brien in swindon. today i'm joined by peter henley. is this to the local election or add those big national issues dominating? as they always seem to. it is difficult if you go into a polling booth and there is the name ofa polling booth and there is the name of a national conservative party, liberal, liberal democrat, not associated with the leader of that party. and somehow feel are you endorsing mrs may's deal if you're taking a conservative box for a local councillor or are you suggesting there should be a come —— confirmatory boat if you are going for it labour? it is difficult even though councillors say it is about baines not brexit, for people to feel that. —— it is about bins. a lot of conservative councillors are
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worried in prosperous areas that are doing well that they will get a backlash from the brexit situation and councillors have been doing theirjobs 20—30 years and they no longer have a place on the local council when it comes to it. it is a real concern, maybe people were stay—at—home or maybe they cannot bring themselves to vote for a party name even though it is a local election. in terms of the photos what sense do you have about their plans for this week? are they apathetic or fed up with politics, what is going on with brexit? 0r apathetic or fed up with politics, what is going on with brexit? or did they feel now more than ever they need to get out and vote?” they feel now more than ever they need to get out and vote? i think they would like to. some are following brexit, some have switched off. whether they understand their local politics or whether they feel their vote might actually have something for the bins are planning, or social care. those are things that worried them but they are not sure how much of a difference their vote will make and in the confusion
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over the national picture i get the sense that people are saying i don't know if it really matters, which could be a problem in terms of the political balance of some of the finely balanced council like winchester or portsmouth, where liberal democrats and conservatives have a tussle. good to talk to you. let's find out if what you are saying is reflected in wiltshire. dan 0'brien is there. you are in swindon, our candidates they are also trying to distance themselves a bit from brexit? yes, just a little bit. swindon is always a close race between conservatives and labour. the council has been conservative controlled since 2004 but it is a close race this year. they are defending a tiny majority, a majority of three, it was even smaller last week intel eight labour councillor defected to join the tories but brexit is very much dominated the conversation. 0ne
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local counsellor told me that long for the days when the knock on someone's door and they have a moan about the potholes and library cutbacks. now the knock on people stores are expecting a barrage of brexit. it is dominating the conversation on the doorstep as much as both main parties are trying to focus on local issues. what about smaller parties, are they hoping to capitalise? very much though. we have several liberal democrat candidates, severalfrom have several liberal democrat candidates, several from you have several liberal democrat candidates, severalfrom you cap —— you kip —— ukip. they're hoping to capitalise on a general frustration british politics. labour and the tories are talking them down whereas these parties want to capitalise on it. they are worried their voters we re it. they are worried their voters
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were stay—at—home. they are not concerned about them going to other parties, they are worried about their core voters not turning out on thursday. it would not take much with this council to be tipped into no overall control and if that happens the smaller parties have indicated they are minded to support a labour administration in swindon above a conservative one. a full list of candidates is on the council website. really interesting to hear your thoughts in swindon. thank you to you both. and full coverage of those results will be contained in a special programme on the bbc news channel from 11:30 on thursday evening. after weeks of protests about the impact of climate change, taking better care of the soil could be one answer to cutting emmissions. a major global report suggests soil quality is becoming poorer, which not only reduces our ability to grow crops but also releases carbon into the atmosphere, adding to global warming. here's our environment analyst, roger harrabin.
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soil erosion — a double problem. here in the east of england, this isn't smog in the air. it is soil, on a hot, windy day. losing soil like this lowers our ability to grow crops. it also releases carbon trapped in the earth, and that contributes to climate change. in parts of the south of england, some carelessly farmed fields are steadily running into the rivers. soil degradation is a problem said to affect almost half the world's people. look at this tsunami of dust last year in phoenix, arizona. it is the result of a spectacular storm. for most farmers, soil loss is a creeping problem that is only noticed too late. soils are really important for climate change, as well, because they store a lot of carbon. there's three times more carbon stored in soil than there actually is in the atmosphere. so you imagine, if all that carbon was released from the soil
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into the atmosphere, we'd have — this is the runaway climate change that people are concerned about. so what to do? well, we know cows' burps are a problem for climate change, but their dung also helps put carbon back into the soil. so this mobile dairy in the south of england may prove part of a solution. it means cows spread their dung across the fields, not leave it in the farmyard. that way, nutrients and carbon from the pasture return to the soil. we were worried that the soil was becoming dead. there was no vitality in the soil, there was no resilience in the soil. so we realised we need to put grass back into the system, and to manage the grass, we've brought in dairy cows. here is the evidence. this field, with its light, stony soil, is depleted from crops grown with chemical fertilisers. see the much darker, carbon—rich soil in the far ploughed field, previously fertilised by cows. the simplest way of combating climate change and improving
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the soil is to turn all this farmland into woodland. but that wouldn't feed the people, would it? perhaps a form of farming like this can be gentler on the environment, while keeping milk on the table. we've got to radically cut the number of cattle on earth, scientists tell us. is there a role for pasture—fed cows like these, that burp out methane but also help the soil? we don't have a clear answer yet. liverpool university has apologised, and said it's conducting a review of its policies after it was revealed that disabled students at the university had been charged for long—term extensions to their assignments because of ill—health. the victoria derbyshire programme spoke to two students who were charged a total of £250 each for two extensions. alex gatenby has been to meet them. i'm locked out of my university account, because i've been charged for an extension and i can't pay
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for the charge at the moment. so i've got no access to my emails, no access to documents for my dissertation. we have learned that the university of liverpool has been charging disabled students who require long term extensions to their assignments because of ill health. this happened to students felicity and kayley, who have mental and physical health conditions. the invoice said £50 for each of us. this was for the first three month extension that we both got. following this first charge, they were both granted a second extension, but once again faced another bill, this time for £200. we've raised their complaint with the university, who now say that they are reviewing charging for extensions. they also pointed out that despite her accepted extension due to her health condition, kayley is not registered with them as a disabled student. but these deadline charges are just one of the concerns i found about disability support
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at liverpool university. nana has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair, and she's struggled with accessibility at liverpool. so how many times have you now been scheduled into rooms that are inaccessible to you? so you can't actually see any of the lecture notes? no. the university of liverpool have now apologised for the timetabling of lectures in inaccessible rooms. they have also removed
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the frosted glass. her experience is not an isolated case. i just got to a stage where i was so angry at the university for not helping me. julia has a connective tissue disorder, which causes her chronic pain. during a number of exams, julia has required adjustments such as the use of an ergonomic chair, were not put in place. it was physically a test of my pain tolerance and not my academic ability. the university of liverpool told us that they are committed to fulfilling their obligations under the equality act, but they accept that there are occasions where they have fallen short and say they will involve disabled students more regularly in the decision—making process going forward. the headlines on bbc news... victims of rape and other crimes
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are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts, or face seeing their case dropped. spain's governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election — but prime minister pedro sanchez will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. new proposals to fund social care in england could see the over 50s forced to pay more than 300—pounds a year extra in national insurance. more than six thousand people have been forced out of their homes near the canadian city of montreal because of rising floodwater. a combination of melting snow and heavy rainfall has aslo led to the capital 0ttowa declaring a state of emergency. donna larsen has the details. this is the result of heavy rains and melting snow. spring flooding in eastern canada has already affected thousands of people and properties.
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this dam at bells falls in quebec is dangerously over capacity and authorities have ordered anybody down river to evacuate, but such warnings came too late for the residents of one town near montreal, where more than 6,500 people were forced to leave their homes after floodwaters breached a dyke, sending a five—foot surge of water crashing through the area. the canadian capital 0ttawa and montreal are among the places which have declared states of emergency. and hundreds of soldiers have been deployed to the hardest—hit regions as residents do what they can to shore up their houses. my basement is currently flooding because the power is out as of today. my backyard is flooding too because there's a swamp back there, so i'm pretty much surrounded except for a little bit in the front. canada's prime minister has visited some of the affected areas, even filling up sandbags,
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but it will take more than a carefully planned photocall to solve the problem, whichjustin trudeau says is a result of climate change. with climate change, we're going to see more and more of these extreme weather events more regularly. we need to think about adaptation, mitigation and how we will move forward together. in some places, the floodwaters are now starting to recede, enabling people to assess the damage, but with more rain forecast over the coming days, others can only watch and wait. donna larsen, bbc news, quebec. now, more than 100—thousand people have watched the moment that a london marathon runner, dressed as big ben, got stuck trying to cross the finish line. i'm glad to say that the runner, lukas bates, has finally escaped his costume, and he's been speaking on bbc breakfast about that moment when he hit the finishing line. after running 26 miles yesterday, i thought the easier part
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of the race would be to cross the finish line, and as i got to it, i... the top of my costume... well, it didn't fit through the finish line! so i, yeah, a very kind marshall helped angle my costume so that i could get the tower underneath and slowly, yeah, complete the race. it is so funny to watch. the thing is, i would imagine, you are a serious runner anyway, so much preparation would have gone into the race. and yet, did you even consider that you wouldn't be able to get under the finish line? no. i always said if i was going to do it in a costume, i wanted to go big. maybe i went a bit too big. tell us about the conversation. you hit the finishing line. did you first of all realise what happened ? and then what is the conversation that you and the marshall are having?
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well, it was quite awkward, really, because i can't really see much out of the costume. i was quite delirious from running the distance. yes, i was just being angled and trying to get myself into a squat position to go nice and low to get through it. yes, it is lovely. it has made quite a nice moment for people to see and it has been great for my charity to help the publicity. through people seeing it, i ran for dementia revolution, which is the alzheimer's society and alzheimer's research uk. having two grandparents who have had dementia, it has been, yes, it has been wonderful to... well, for people to see that, and having given a really substantial amount of money to the charities, it is so appreciated, it has been absolutely amazing. you have had a few extra donations as well based on the number of people watching the video. completely.
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can i ask you, i want to know your thought processes in the final 100 metres, at any point did you think of "hold on a minute, my head isa bit big, i'm in trouble", or was it only when you hit it that you realise you could not get underneath it? yeah, no, i was far too confident, i did not think there would be any problems at all! it was only when i hit it that i thought, "oh, dear, this hasn't gone to plan!" great to hear his costume escapades led to more money being raised for his charity. avengers: endgame has made box office history by taking a record—breaking 1.2 billion dollars in global ticket sales in its opening run. the disney blockbuster has become the fastest film ever to break the $1 billion barrier, doing so in just five days. endgame is the 22nd offering in the marvel studios superhero franchise. earlier i spoke to our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba — who explained why the film concluding such a long—running series is key to its success...
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that is the key attraction for so many people who follwed the marvel movies and perhaps haven't seen every single one but are keen to see how this section of movies will come to an end with this film. it had some big obstacles to overcome. a three hour plus running time, which means cinemas can't programme as many showings in a day as they would with other films. they make less money that way. particularly in america, they have tackled that by some places having 24 hours screenings, so cinemas stayed open 24—hours today showing it almost on a loop to audiences. demand was there as well. they have some advantages, as well. this one had a more coordinated global release. in china, it made around $330 million, about a quarter of the total. previous movies haven't opened in china simultaneously so haven't counted but even without china, it would still have the record.
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the key thing looking forward now for people is can it do what others have done and become the biggest film of all time, can it overtake the likes of titanic and avatar, which is the current biggest movie with 2.7 billion? we are waiting to see. let's see, i haven't seen avatar actually. maybe i should watch that one. what is it about this film, no spoilers, please, but there is that element of familiarity with the characters, but are there lots of new twists and interesting things that the audience might not be expecting? i haven't seen it yet. i was away last week during the james bond launch injamaica. that is a pretty good excuse as they go! it is the way i think people are invested in the characters. unlike lots of other movies, it has had good reaction from the critics, a very good rotten tomatoes, the critic site, score. the best advertising for any movie is word—of—mouth and the word—of—mouth
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is very, very strong. people are going on social media, talking to their friends, saying you really have to see this. it really is something. that is what has powered so many movies to the very top. it is very easy to open a movie in some senses, you can throw advertising at it, huge premiers everywhere, get people to see it in the first weekend, it is what happens after that that is crucial. it looks like this will maintain that momentum. titanic‘s biggest weekend was four weekends in, for example, by word of mouth. it looks like it will carry on with this huge momentum over the coming weeks. that accolade of being the biggest box office movie of all time is definitely in sight, if not guaranteed. a pair of giant pandas have left china, heading for russia for a 15—year collaborative research project between the two countries.
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ding ding and ru yi will leave the china conservation and research centre for giant panda's later today, before travelling to moscow zoo. it's part of a plan between the two countries to further promote international cooperation on giant panda protection, and improve conservation of endangered species. in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news with ben brown but first it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. good afternoon, despite the chilly start this morning the mist and fog, for many it has turned out to be pretty decent with spells of sunshine with high pressure largely in charge. there are a weak weather fronts towards the west so it hasn't been seen saving for northern ireland and the west of england and wales where we have a host of cloud and patchy rain and drizzle. these shower cloud for the south could give a shout for the likes of cambridgeshire and lancashire but for the vast majority it is dry and quite warm, temperatures a little
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bit higher than yesterday but notably so for the north of scotland which could achieve 20 degrees in the next hour. some of the one sunshine to be enjoyed well into this evening for the majority but not for northern ireland or western fringes of england and wales we have the weather front popping up through the weather front popping up through the night. no mist for us here but under the starry skies it will turn showery over night and there could be some mist and fog returning to the east coast by morning and the central lowlands. we change the wind direction tomorrow is where the front direction tomorrow is where the fro nt m oves direction tomorrow is where the front moves in and make further progress on to mainland uk, it is pushed that the cloud offshore so hopefully some improvement for central lowlands but further that westie rain is coming in for glasgow. after a morning of damp weather it may clean clear away but further east will keep some sunshine around with some fine and dry weather. through tomorrow night and three wednesday, that weather front does make more definite progress in
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land, across england, wales, scotland, although it clears temporarily for northern ireland thatis temporarily for northern ireland that is more rain to come back in. temperatures in the sunshine will get into the mid to high teens, 16-17 but it get into the mid to high teens, 16—17 but it will be the last day this week we see those kind of temperatures because on thursday, there is a more definite change from this atlantic westerleigh to a artic northerly. i cold and fairly brisk winds will descend across the uk, bringing a risk of wintry showers, especially over the hills and the north but amateurs are starting to drop away, even in london on friday. 0nly drop away, even in london on friday. only 12 degrees celsius. if that wasn't enough there is a potential guidance beware of night—time frost, especially friday and saturday night. goodbye.
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rape victims told to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. it comes after the collapse of a string of trials when crucial evidence emerged on mobile phones — but campaigners are concerned. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape who may be severely traumatised already by what happened. it's another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims. we'll have the latest from our legal correspondent this lunchtime. spain's socialists celebrate victory in the country's general election — though they can't form a government by themselves. fewer british holiday—makers booking summer breaks in europe,

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